Some people come to us in pieces, but that doesn’t mean they are broken. They may choose to give different parts and depths of themselves; perhaps different from what we may wish to receive or hope to hold at once … or for not near long enough.


Only God knows the full measure of the stride of one’s steps, the pace of one’s heart, and the breadth of one’s faith.


We must train ourselves in the practice of grace — embracing the love we receive instead of judging what is missing or lingering in pockets of disappointment. For when we begin to accept people where they are at rather than how we wish them to be, we will soon accept the full measure of what they are willing to give. We will soon appreciate their pieces as whole moments where we can be fully present, freeing ourselves of bitterness and unmet expectations.


In offering Christ-like grace, we release the burden of charred disappointment with others. We, in effect, become more whole, more holy. We realize through God’s refinement upon us (Psalm 66:10), that in some manner, all people come to one another in pieces, but that doesn’t mean we are all broken. We are hemmed in by a loving savior, who accepts us where we are at and knits us together with redeeming grace and love.


Psalm 139:5 says, “You hem me in behind and before, and you lay your hand upon me.”


Even when this world inevitably spirals and we feel the twists of life, God reminds us that he is in control, and that “in Christ we, though many, form one body, and each member belongs to all the others” (Romans 12:5). Thus, believers are never truly broken, for we are one in Christ. We must remember our commonality so that we can “accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God” (Romans 15:7).


Indeed, only God knows the full measure of the stride of one’s steps, the pace of one’s heart, and the breadth of one’s faith.


May we ask God to guide us as we learn to humbly walk beside one another, rather than fall away in bitterness and unmet expectations.


May we choose to practice grace today.


SGLY, dear readers.


(Smile, God Loves You.)